Drought and Misguided Focus


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Drought, Food, and The Future

Drought, Food, and The Future
The drought has brought in sharp focus many issues, fundamentally it is about water, lack of water. Water however is no where near the top of the discussions we hear.
Perspectives shape views, concerns range from crop production, farm losses, food prices, balance between energy and food ratios, inflation. Food shortages have lead to at least a few regimes demise through out history. Remember, drought is about lack of water.
This brings us to a whole new view and issues, aquifers, drawdown and recharge, we are pumping water out far faster than it is replenishing itself. Some large aquifers are in fact expected by science to go dry. The Ogallala is ancient glacial water, the recharge source has been gone for thousands of years. The Ogallala is the largest aquifer in America.
Since the 1950’s, “predevelopment” when we your started pumping water out of Ogallala with electric pumps instead of windmills, the water table level has been dropping.
Unfortunately, this is a fact worldwide. So food production to feed the estimated nine billion world population twenty five years from now, must be the bigger question.
Questions from an individuals point of view could be, how can I and my offspring really be prepared. Personal responsibility and an individualistic spirit exemplified our ancestors. What can I do now to be prepared, for the generations to come.
Your water source is the key, do you depend on a municipal system? How secure do feel about that? Are you looking forward to a time when the ability to produce a percentage of your our required nutrition may be required? Remember the 2012 drought is leading to food shortages worldwide with six billion people today. World population is expected to increase by fifty percent in the next twenty five years.
With a relatively small parcel of land you can produce; grass feed beef, poultry, eggs, pork, fruits, vegetables, even milk, cheese, and fish, but you have to have a stable supply of water. It is a ton of work. It is how most Americans got through the depression, self sufficiency. We have superior tools and technology than they did. Greenhouses, electric well pumps, solar applications, aquaponics, kitchen counter sized milk pasteurizers. The list goes on and on. Self sustainable lifestyles are considerably easier today than it was in the 1930’s.
The oil industry, hydrology, geology, climate change studies, well monitoring, flow gauge measurements of seeps and springs, weather monitoring of precipitation and snow pack, all add to our data and knowledge about what is going on below the surface of the land. We have a great deal of science regarding which water sources are stable, or in balance and which are not or may not be.
Where you own land will determine whether you have water or not.
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